Our first day:

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Cape Town

We slept 12 hours and missed half of today, but it completely helped with the jetlag-as neither of us felt any.

Upon arising, we headed to Clarke’s Bar & Dining and had a most excellent brunch and discussion with our waiter about the beauty of ZA, the awesomeness of Mandela and the funny opposite breaks our students have {their summer  holiday is from November-January}. I highly recommend this restaurant for great food and service.

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http://www.clarkesdining.co.za/

From here, we drove a small distance of 13 km to Kristenbosch  Gardens where a friend had shown us sights of a new ‘Boomslang,’ a treetop canopy. {Boomslang is a snake, and this pathway fits this name.}

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The canopy was fun and moved as we walked {not swaying, but moving like a shimmy}. It was fascinating to eexperience the engineering design of this canopy walkway. We continued up into the Table Mountain National Park for a short hike and then back into the sculpture gardens. The gardens were a great half day trip and we’re lush with fascinating flora, such as the King Protea, South Africa’s National Flower.

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This flower was so large and beautiful and grows naturally only in Cape Town.
From their website:

Kirstenbosch was established in 1913 to promote, conserve and display the extraordinarily rich and diverse flora of southern Africa, and was the first botanic garden in the world to be devoted to a country’s indigenous flora.

Kirstenbosch displays a wide variety of the unique plant life of the Cape Flora, also known as fynbos, including sugarbushes (Protea spp.), pincushions (Leucospermum spp.) and heaths (Erica spp.). Plants from all the diverse regions and biomes of southern Africa are also grown at Kirstenbosch, including a near-complete collection of cycads (Encephalartos spp.). The Botanical Society Conservatory is a custom-built glasshouse to grow and display plants from the arid regions that cannot survive outdoors. There are over 7 000 species in cultivation at Kirstenbosch, including many rare and threatened species. See more on the virtual tour.

More than just a garden, Kirstenbosch is part of a nature reserve. The 36 hectare garden is part of a 528 hectare estate that contains protected mountainside supporting natural forest and fynbos along with a variety of animals and birds. The Kirstenbosch Estate borders the Table Mountain National Park, and the Garden merges seamlessly with the natural fynbos and forest of the mountain.

Kirstenbosch lies in the heart of the Cape Floristic Region, also known as the Cape Floral Kingdom. In 2004 the Cape Floristic Region, including Kirstenbosch was established in 1913 to promote, conserve and display the extraordinarily rich and diverse flora of southern Africa, and was the first botanic garden in the world to be devoted to a country’s indigenous flora.

Kirstenbosch displays a wide variety of the unique plant life of the Cape Flora, also known as fynbos, including sugarbushes (Protea spp.), pincushions (Leucospermum spp.) and heaths (Erica spp.). Plants from all the diverse regions and biomes of southern Africa are also grown at Kirstenbosch, including a near-complete collection of cycads (Encephalartos spp.). The Botanical Society Conservatory is a custom-built glasshouse to grow and display plants from the arid regions that cannot survive outdoors. There are over 7 000 species in cultivation at Kirstenbosch, including many rare and threatened species. See more on the virtual tour.

More than just a garden, Kirstenbosch is part of a nature reserve. The 36 hectare garden is part of a 528 hectare estate that contains protected mountainside supporting natural forest and fynbos along with a variety of animals and birds. The Kirstenbosch Estate borders the Table Mountain National Park, and the Garden merges seamlessly with the natural fynbos and forest of the mountain. Find out more

Kirstenbosch lies in the heart of the Cape Floristic Region, also known as the Cape Floral Kingdom. In 2004 the Cape Floristic Region, including Kirstenbosch, was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site – another first for Kirstenbosch. It is the first botanic garden in the world to be included within a natural World Heritage Site.

It has been hailed as the most beautiful garden in Africa. 🙂 Worth the R50 entrance  fee and a leisurely afternoon. In the summertime, concerts are held on the green grassy grounds. What an amazing experience that would be!

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We finished our first day with a delectable call one that tasted like the best Indian food I have ever eaten.
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Again, I am going to recommend Col’Cacchio Pizzeria. This pizzeria was chic and sported a brick oven! Just the thing we needed for our traditional Sunday Night Pizza.

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